Course Descriptions

CHE 1101. Introductory Chemistry I  (3).F;S.
GEN ED: Science Inquiry Perspective (Theme: "Chemistry: Connections to Our Changing World")
A study of the fundamental principles of chemistry emphasizing modern atomic theory, the structure and behavior of atoms, the properties and states of matter, energy relations, periodicity and mole concepts. Lecture three hours. Corequisite or prerequisite:  CHE 1110. (NUMERICAL DATA) (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

CHE 1102. Introductory Chemistry II  (3).F;S.
GEN ED: Science Inquiry Perspective (Theme: "Chemistry: Connections to Our Changing World")
A study of properties of solutions, acid-base concepts, equilibria, elementary thermodynamics, elementary kinetics, electrochemistry. Lecture three hours. Prerequisites: CHE 1101 and CHE 1110; corequisite or prerequisite: CHE 1120. (NUMERICAL DATA) (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

CHE 1110. Introductory Chemistry Laboratory I  (1).F;S.
GEN ED: Science Inquiry Perspective (Theme: "Chemistry: Connections to Our Changing World")
Laboratory experiments to supplement the study of the topics listed under CHE 1101. Laboratory three hours. Corequisite or
prerequisite: CHE 1101. (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES)

CHE 1120. Introductory Chemistry Laboratory II  (1).F;S.
GEN ED: Science Inquiry Perspective (Theme: "Chemistry: Connections to Our Changing World")
Laboratory experiments to supplement the study of the topics listed under CHE 1102. Laboratory three hours. Corequisite or
prerequisite: CHE 1102. (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES)

CHE 2101. Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry (3).F;S.
A study of the fundamental concepts and basic physical and chemical properties of the major classes of the compounds of carbon. Emphasis is placed upon the importance of these groups in living systems and in everyday life. Lecture three hours. Prerequisites: CHE 1102 and CHE 1120; prerequisite or corequisite: CHE 2203. This course is not an appropriate prerequisite for CHE 2202.

CHE 2000. Sophomore Research (1).F;S.
Independent research under the direct supervision of a faculty member. Three hours per week of laboratory work, regular progress reports, and a final written report are required. Prerequisite: CHE 1120 or permission of the instructor.

CHE 2201. Organic Chemistry I 
(3).F;S.
First course of a two-semester sequence in organic chemistry. An in-depth study of structure, bonding, properties and stereochemistry of carbon compounds. Introduction to classes of organic compounds and their nomenclature, reaction mechanisms and organic synthesis will also be introduced. Lecture three hours. Prerequisites: CHE 1102 and CHE 1120; prerequisite or corequisite: CHE 2203.

CHE 2202. Organic Chemistry II  (3).F;S.
Second course of a two-semester sequence in organic chemistry. Continuing coverage of the classes of organic compounds. Detailed coverage of spectroscopy, carbonyl compounds (aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and derivatives), and amines. Amino acids, carbohydrates and proteins will also be introduced. Reaction mechanisms, organic synthesis and spectroscopy will be emphasized. Lecture three hours. Prerequisites: CHE 2201 and CHE 2203 (with a minimum grade of “C-” in each). Corequisite or prerequisite: CHE 2204.

CHE 2203. Organic Chemistry Laboratory I 
(1).F;S.
Laboratory practice in the synthesis of organic compounds and the use of common laboratory techniques. Laboratory three hours. Prerequisites: CHE 1102, CHE 1120; corequisite or prerequisite: CHE 2101 or CHE 2201.

CHE 2204. Organic Chemistry Laboratory II
(1).F;S.
Laboratory practice in synthesis, separations, practical spectroscopy, and determination of unknowns. Laboratory three hours. Prerequisites: CHE 2201 and CHE 2203 (with a minimum grade of “C-” in each). Corequisite or prerequisite: CHE 2202. (WRITING)

CHE 2210. Quantitative Analysis
(3).F;S.
An introduction to analytical chemistry, including a rigorous examination of facets of homogeneous and heterogeneous equilibrium; electrochemical, spectrophotometric, gravimetric, and chromatographic analysis; and evaluation of data. Lecture three hours. Prerequisites: CHE 1102 and CHE 1120. Corequisite or prerequisite: CHE 2211.

CHE 2211. Quantitative Analysis Laboratory (1).F;S.
An introduction to analytical chemistry techniques of volumetric, gravimetric, potentiometric, chromatographic, and spectroscopic analysis. The basic methods of quantitative analysis are introduced and practiced with laboratory unknowns. Laboratory four hours. Corequisite or prerequisite: CHE 2210. (WRITING)

CHE 2400. Introduction to Forensic Chemistry and Criminalistics
(3).F.
Introduction to forensic chemistry, including utilization of physical evidence in law enforcement, processing a crime scene, the application of chemistry techniques in the identification and analysis of physical evidence (drugs, blood, fire residues, glass, soil, ink, etc.), forensic toxicology, forensic microscopy, and forensic aspects of arson. Techniques such as chromatography, ultraviolet-visible and infrared spectroscopy, refractive index measurements, breath-analyzers, DNA fingerprinting, and blood-typing will be discussed. Prerequisites: CHE 1102 and CHE 1120. (CROSS-DISCIPLINARY )

CHE 2500. Independent Study (1-4).F;S.

CHE 2525. TA in Introductory Chemistry (1).F;S.
A supervised experience in the instructional process at the post-secondary school level through direct participation in a laboratory setting. Graded on an S/U basis. Prerequisites: CHE 1101, CHE 1110, CHE 1102, and CHE 1120. May be repeated for a total credit of two semester hours.

CHE 2526. Chemical Safety (1).F.
This course will focus on chemical safety education for students interested in careers in fields involving chemicals and chemical processes. This course will emphasize the in-depth development of “A Safety Culture.” The areas of risk reduction and worker protection, government agencies and regulations, and safe chemical management will be addressed. The primary focus will be on best practices in the academic laboratory and The Laboratory Standard, but industry standards will also be covered. Prerequisites: CHE 1101 and CHE 1110 or permission of the instructor.

CHE 2530–2549. Selected Topics
(1-4). On Demand.

CHE 2550. Introduction to Environmental Chemistry (3).F.
An introduction to environmental issues as seen through a chemical perspective. A broad survey of the biosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, atmosphere, and energy will be conducted. Specific topics include toxic organic compounds, pesticides, environmental endocrine disruptors, metal pollution, natural water chemistry, water pollution and purification, soil chemistry, soil contamination and remediation, the ozone hole, smog, global warming, alternative fuels, and renewable energy. A combination of lecture and lab which meets once per week for three hours. Prerequisites: CHE 1102 and CHE 1120. (CROSS-DISCIPLINARY )

CHE 3000. Introduction to Chemical Research (1).F;S.
An introduction to the techniques and methodology of chemical research. Topics include survey of the chemical literature; information retrieval services; making effective oral presentations, and ethics and safety in the chemical laboratory. This course requires formal speaking. Prerequisites: CHE 2101 or CHE 2202 and CHE 2210. (SPEAKING)

CHE 3301–3302. Physical Chemistry I–II  (3-3).F-S.
Physical Chemistry is built upon four major theoretical principles; thermodynamics, kinetics, quantum mechanics, and statistical mechanics. Physical Chemistry I covers an introduction to thermodynamics and kinetics. Physical Chemistry II covers an introduction to quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics. Prerequisites: CHE 2210, CHE 2211, MAT 1120, PHY 1150, and PHY 1151. Lecture three hours. (COMPUTER)

CHE 3303-3304. Physical Chemistry Laboratory
(1-1).F-S.
GEN ED: Junior Writing in the Discipline (WID) (CHE 3303)
Experimental investigations which supplement the study of the topics in physical chemistry. Applications of computer techniques for data reduction and manipulation will be introduced and utilized. Prerequisites: CHE 2210, CHE 2211, MAT 1120, PHY 1150, PHY 1151, and ENG 2001 or its equivalent. Corequisite or prerequisite: CHE 3301. (WRITING)

CHE 3400. Junior Research
(1).F;S.
Independent research under the direct supervision of a faculty member. Three hours per week of laboratory work, regular progress reports, and a final written report are required. Prerequisite: CHE 2000 or permission of the instructor.

CHE 3404. Inorganic Chemistry
(3).S.
The fundamentals of atomic theory and valence bond, ligand field and molecular orbital theories for interpretation of chemical bonding are considered in detail. Applications of these theories to the magnetic and spectral properties, structure, stability, and reaction mechanisms of inorganic compounds are examined, with emphasis on the transition metals. Symmetry and group theory are used to describe the fundamentals of X-ray crystallography. The role of metal atoms in organometallic and bioinorganic molecular systems is considered. Prerequisite: CHE 3301. Lecture three hours.

CHE 3405. Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory
(1).S.
Experimental investigations which supplement the study of inorganic chemistry, involving reactions in inert atmospheres, vacuum systems and hot tubes. Corequisite or prerequisite: CHE 3404. Laboratory three hours.

CHE 3500. Independent Study
(1–4).F;S.

CHE 3520. Instructional Assistance
(1).F;S.
A supervised experience in the instructional process at the University level through direct participation in a classroom situation. Graded on an S/U basis. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing. May be repeated for a total credit of three semester hours.

CHE 3521. Secondary Science Field Experience (1).F;S.
A supervised experience in the instructional process at the secondary school level through direct participation in a classroom situation. Graded on an S/U basis. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing. May be repeated for a total credit of three semester hours. Required of all teacher-licensure candidates in chemistry.

CHE 3530–3549. Selected Topics (1-4). On Demand.

CHE 3560. Instrumental Methods of Analysis
(3).S.
A study of some of the modern instrumental methods of analysis including electrochemistry, atomic and molecular spectroscopy, magnetic resonance spectrometry, mass spectrometry and gas chromatography. Lecture three hours. Prerequisite: CHE 3301. Corequisite or prerequisite: CHE 3561.

CHE 3561. Instrumental Methods of Analysis Laboratory
(1).S.
Experimental investigations involving spectroscopic, electrochemical, and chromatographic measurements to enhance the understanding of sampling, sample preparation, data reduction, use of analytical instrumentation and data interpretation. Computational techniques for data reduction and modeling will be required. Laboratory three hours. Corequisite or prerequisite: CHE 3560. (WRITING)

CHE 4000. Chemistry Seminar (1).F;S.
GEN ED: Capstone Experience
A senior capstone experience on the presentation and discussion of current chemical topics. Oral and written reports are required. Prerequisites: CHE 3000 and CHE 3303. (SPEAKING)

CHE 4200. Brewing Science and Analysis
(4).S.
This course will provide a rigorous coverage of the chemical and physical processes that go into brewing malted beverages, including coverage of the hops, malt, and yeast varieties and how they are combined to produce specific styles and flavors of beers. Flavor and aroma compounds will be quantified by students using appropriate instrumental techniques. Laboratory and lecture combined four hours. Prerequisites: CHE 2210 and CHE 2211. (Same as FER 4200.)

CHE 4400. Senior Research (1).F;S.
A laboratory research project under the supervision of a faculty member. An oral report of the work in progress will be made at the regular seminar and a written report of the results is to be submitted to the chemistry faculty upon completion. May be completed abroad at a university with which Appalachian has an articulation agreement with approval of the department chair. Laboratory four hours (minimum). Prerequisite: CHE 4000 or permission of the instructor. May be repeated once for credit. (SPEAKING)

CHE 4510. Chemistry Honors Thesis
(1).F;S.
Independent study and research for an honors thesis directed by a faculty member of the A.R. Smith Department of Chemistry. Prerequisite: completion of seven honors credit hours in chemistry (including CHE 4000 with honors) and a minimum grade point average of 3.45 overall and in chemistry. All honors students must earn credit in this course in two different semesters. To complete the honors thesis requirements, a written thesis must be submitted to and approved by the Department of Chemistry Honors Committee.

CHE 4580. Biochemistry I  (3).F;S.
This course covers the properties of amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids and presents a brief introduction to enzymology. Major emphasis is on the chemistry of biological compounds. An introduction to intermediary metabolism is also presented. Prerequisite: CHE 2101 or CHE 2202. Lecture three hours. [Dual-listed with CHE 5580.] Dual-listed courses require senior standing; juniors may enroll with permission of the department.

CHE 4581. Biochemistry I Laboratory
(1).F;S.
Experimental investigations which supplement the study of the topics in biochemistry. Prerequisite: CHE 2203 (or equivalent); co- or prerequisite: CHE 4580 or CHE 5580 (or equivalent). Laboratory three hours. (WRITING) [Dual-listed with CHE 5581.] Dual-listed courses require senior standing; juniors may enroll with permission of the department.

CHE 4582. Biochemistry II
 (3).S.
This course will cover the intermediary metabolism of amino acids, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids. Metabolic pathways and their associated enzymes are emphasized. Prerequisite: CHE 4580 with CHE 3301 recommended but not required. Lecture three hours. [Dual-listed with CHE 5582.] Dual-listed courses require senior standing; juniors may enroll with permission of the department.

CHE 4590. Spectral Interpretations (2).F.
A study of the use of spectral data for the identification of organic compounds. Techniques will include UV, IR, NMR, MS, ORD and CD in the identification process. Prerequisites: CHE 2202 and CHE 2204. Lecture two hours.

CHE 4595. NMR Spectroscopy (2).S.
The lecture portion of the course will cover basic nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy theory and practice, with particular attention given to the instrumentation available in the department. The laboratory portion of the course will focus on learning to utilize the NMR instrumentation available in the department. Prerequisite: CHE 4560 or CHE 4590. Lecture one hour, laboratory three hours.

CHE 4600. Selected Topics (1–4). On Demand.
An opportunity to study a special topic or combination of topics not otherwise provided for in the chemistry curriculum. May be repeated for credit when content does not duplicate. Prerequisite: upper-division status or departmental permission.

CHE 4610. History of Chemistry (3).S.
A study of the development of chemistry as a science with emphasis on the development of basic concepts, ideas and theories. Prerequisite: a year of introductory chemistry. Lecture three hours.

CHE 4620. Environmental Chemistry (4).S.
GEN ED: Capstone Experience A capstone course for students pursuing a concentration in Environmental Chemistry, this course will focus the wide diversity of subject matter required by this major. The course will involve discussions and applications of air, water and soil chemistry while giving the student an appreciation of the scientific, legal, political and economic issues inherent in Environmental Chemistry. Prerequisites: CHE 3301, CHE 4560, STT 2810. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours.

CHE 4630. Forensic Toxicology (3).S.
This course provides an introduction to forensic toxicology. Topics include the history of toxicology, basic classification of illicit drugs, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, the isolation and analyses of these drugs in a forensic setting, and specific analyte categories. Lecture three hours. Prerequisite: CHE 2101 or CHE 2202.

CHE 4640. Analytical Methods in Forensic Chemistry (4).F.
This course provides an in-depth discussion of forensic analysis. Topics include analytical tools, statistical analysis, principles of separations and spectroscopy, and the analysis of drugs, arson samples, explosives, paints, and fibers. The course will expand upon CHE 3560 (Instrumental Methods of Analysis) in that the basics learned in that course will be used specifically for forensic analysis. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Prerequisites: CHE 3560 and CHE 3561.

CHE 4800. Forensic Microscopy
(4).S.
This course covers the fundamentals of microscopy and introduces various methods and applications for forensic analysis of trace evidence, including Kohler illumination, micrometry, crystallization methods, microchemical testing, refractive index measurements, crystal optics, interference figures, fusion methods, bacterial and tissue staining, and electron microscopy. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: CHE 2202 or permission of the instructor.

CHE 4900. Internship in Chemistry
(1-12).F;S.
GEN ED: Capstone Experience  Independent, supervised work in applied chemistry at an approved industrial, quality control, analysis, or production facility. Appropriate entities include, but are not limited to, commercial businesses and governmental agencies. May be taken for a maximum of 12 semester hours, with a maximum of 6 semester hours credit per summer session. Only three of those hours will count toward major requirements. Prerequisite: CHE 3303. Graded on an S/U basis.

Environmental Science Course (ENV)

ENV 4100. Environmental Science Seminar (3).S.
GEN ED: Capstone Experience
This course emphasizes the critical need for a multi-disciplinary and cooperative approach to solving challenging environmental issues on local and global scales. The course is project-driven and employs literature and case study research, data gathering, and active group problem-solving to address issues such as scientific and engineering solutions, environmental and economic impacts, regulatory compliance, and public policy. Students are required to disseminate project results via written reports, oral presentations, and/or poster sessions. This course serves as the senior capstone course for students enrolled in the Bachelor of Science degree in
Environmental Science. Lecture two hours, laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: senior standing or permission of the instructor.

Graduate Courses

CHE 5070. Advanced Physical Chemistry/(4).F. Rigorous treatment of the laws of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. Applications to gases, solutions and other condensed phases, studies of surface effects. Lecture four hours.

CHE 5500. Independent Study/(1-4).F;S.

CHE 5530-5549. Selected Topics/(1-4).On Demand. An opportunity to study a special topic or combination of topics not otherwise provided for in the chemistry curriculum. May be repeated for credit when content does not duplicate. Prerequisite: graduate status.

CHE 5560. Instrumental Methods of Analysis/(4).F. A study of some of the modern instrumental methods of analysis including electrochemistry, atomic and molecular spectroscopy, magnetic resonance spectrometry, mass spectrometry and gas chromatography. Prerequisite: CHE 3301 (Physical Chemistry I). Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours.

CHE 5580. Biochemistry I/(3).F;S. This course covers the properties of amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids and presents a brief introduction to enzymology. Major emphasis is on the chemistry of biological compounds. An introduction to intermediary metabolism is also presented. Prerequisite: CHE 2101 (Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry) or CHE 2202 (Organic Chemistry II). Lecture three hours. [Dual-listed with CHE 4580.]

CHE 5581. Biochemistry I Laboratory/(1).F;S. Experimental investigations which supplement the study of the topics in biochemistry. Prerequisite: CHE 2203 (Organic Chemistry Lab I) (or equivalent); co- or prerequisite: CHE 5580 (or equivalent). Laboratory three hours. [Dual-listed with CHE 4581.]

CHE 5582. Biochemistry II/(3).S. This course will cover the intermediary metabolism of amino acids, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids. Metabolic pathways and their associated enzymes are emphasized. Prerequisite: CHE 4580 (Biochemistry) with CHE 3301 (Physical Chemistry I) recommended but not required. Lecture three hours. [Dual-listed with CHE 4582.]

CHE 5989. Graduate Research/(1-9).F;S. This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels. Graded on an S/U basis. CHE 5989 does not count toward a degree.

CHE 5999. Thesis/(4).F;S. Graded on an SP/UP basis until the thesis has been successfully defended and received final approval, at which time all grades will be changed to S.

Undergraduate course desciptions are available from the Department of Chemistry bulletin.

Graduate course descriptions are here.


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